• Irgasan (Triclosan) packaged and labeled.

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SKU: I002

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Description

Irgasan (Triclosan) is a broad spectrum antibacterial agent that inhibits bacterial fatty acid synthesis.   Irgasan is slightly soluble in water and freely soluble in ethanol and methanol.

    CAS Number

    3380-34-5

    Molecular Formula

    C12H7Cl3O2

    Molecular Weight

    289.54

    Mechanism of Action

    Irgasan demonstrates a bacteriostatic effect by binding to the enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (enoyl-ACP), an enzyme involved in fatty acid synthesis. After forming a complex, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) binds and prevents enoyl-ACP from participating in the fatty acid synthesis cycle which inhibits bacterial cell growth.  Triclosan permeabilizes the bacterial envelope. 

    Storage Conditions

    2-8 °C

    Tariff Code

    2909.50.4500

    Spectrum

    Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, Fungi.

Applications

    Eukaryotic Cell Culture Applications

    A widely used model for proliferative epidermis in tissue engineering are the HaCa T keratinocytes. The influence of Irgasan on the cell growth, viability, and proliferation of these keratinocytes was reviewed., since the formation of biofilms pose a serious difficulty in tissue replacement. Collagen-cell-attachment properties on the atelocollagen matrix were not affected by this biocide. Thus, sample type could serve as ‘antimicrobial substrates’, and play a role in the design of novel antimicrobial biomaterials suitable for tissue engineering. (Lopez-Garcia J et al, 2014).

    Microbiology Applications

    Irgasan is used as a media supplement in Pseudomonas and Yersinia isolation agars.

    During the 1990s, bacterial isolates with reduced susceptibility to Irgasan were produced in lab experiments by repeated exposure to sublethal concentrations.  Since 2000, a number of studies have verified resistance among dermal, intestinal, and environmental microorganisms.  (Yazdankhah, 2006).  Resistance in E. coli is acquired through a missense mutation in the fabl gene (Heath et al, 2010).

Specifications

    Form

    Powder

    Appearance

    White powder

    Source

    Synthetic

    Water Content (Karl Fischer)

    ≤0.1%

    Melting Point

    56-60 °C

    Assay

    (Dried Basis): 97.0-103.0%

References

    References

    Heath RJ (2010) Mechanism of Triclosan Inhibition of Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthesis.  J. Biol. Chem. 274(16):11110-4.  PMID 10196195

    Lopez-Garcia J, Lehocky M, Humpolicek P, and Saha P (2014)  HaCa T Keratinocytes response on antimicrobial atelocollagen substrates: Extent of cytotoxicity, cell viability and proliferation. J. Funct. Biomater. 5(2):43-57


    Yazdankhah SP (2006) Triclosan and antimicrobial resistance in bacteria: An overview. Microb Drug Resist. 12(2):83-90  PMID 16922622

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