Gene Selection Antibiotics

Transfection is a process of introducing DNA or other nucleic acids into eukaryotic cells. Foreign DNA can be introduced into eukaryotic cells by chemical-based or physical methods which include electroporation and sonoporation. To ensure DNA has integrated into the cell's genome, a selective marker is co-transfected with the desired gene which usually confers resistance to a selective agent or antibiotic. Selective stress is applied to transfected cells by using a selective agent or selection antibiotic. Only cells that contain the desired gene along with a resistance gene will grow and survive in the presence of a selective agent. Frequently used selection antibiotics include G418, hygromycin b, neomycin, and puromycin.

Which of the following antibiotic resistance genes do your transfected cells contain? 

 
 
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Kanamycin acid sulfate packaged and labeled.
Kanamycin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic often used to select for bacteria which have been successfully...
Quinupristin-Dalfopristin mesylate packaged and labeled in glass vial.
Quinupristin-dalfopristin mesylate is a 70:30 (w/w) complex of two semi-synthetic analogues...
Neomycin sulfate, EP packaged and labeled.
Neomycin sulfate, EP is a broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic composed of a number of related neomycin...
Kanamycin Acid Sulfate, EW
Kanamycin Acid Sulfate, EW, CulturePure® is an aminoglycoside antibiotic often used to select for bacteria which have been successfully...
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